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Resources

The Centre for Menstrual Cycle and Ovulation Research has developed a number of tools and resources that healthcare workers may find helpful.

Perimenopause Frequently Asked Questions

Dr. Jerilynn C. Prior answers FAQ's from Perimenopausal Women

Type: 
Articles
Life Phase: 
Perimenopause

Science based Natural Remedies for Hot Flushes and Night Sweats

Women may feel there are no effective improvements in hot flushes and night sweats except hormone therapy or perhaps a newer type of anti-depressive medication - they rightly may not want to take either of these kinds of medicines. The reality is that a lot of very sensible and generally healthy strategies have been shown to improve hot flushes.

Type: 
Articles
Life Phase: 
Perimenopause, Menopause

The ABC’s Of Osteoporosis Prevention For Menopausal Women

Menopause means graduation! One year has passed since the last menstrual period—perimenopause is over. Because of the hormonal changes of the first few years after menopause, bone renovation is more rapid and risks for bone loss are greater. Thus we must continue habits that will keep bones healthy for the rest of our lives.

Type: 
Handout
Life Phase: 
Menopause

Painful Periods

Painful periods are known as cramps. This section looks at what causes cramps and how to ease the discomfort. Doctors call painful periods or crampsdysmenorrhea.” They are caused by high levels of prostaglandins, a kind of hormone that increases the normal squeezing or contraction of the muscle in the wall of the uterus.

Type: 
Articles

Documenting Ovulation with Quantitative Basal Temperature (QBT)

If our cycles are regular - about a month apart we assume we are ovulatory - meaning releasing an egg and making normal amounts of progesterone. However, ovulation is highly variable for all women. Progesterone raises our first morning (or basal) temperature a little bit. But so do many other things. Thus "basal body temperature" (BBT) charts, even with mid-cycle stretchy mucus (symptothermal methods) may not be accurate for predicting ovulation. Therefore we developed a valid and scientific use of basal temperature called "Quantitative Basal Temperature" (QBT) to assess ovulation and the luteal phase length (number of days of progesterone elevation).

Type: 
Handout

Progesterone (not Estrogen) for Hot Flushes in Perimenopausal and Menopausal Women

In less than a year, two influential articles reporting on consensus recommendations for therapy of “menopause-associated” and “menopausal” symptoms concluded that estrogen (with or without progestin) is the optimal therapy.
The purposes of this article are to propose that progesterone therapy is an equally or more effective hot flush/night sweat therapy than estrogen and to show that progesterone is safer than estrogen or estrogen with progestin (a synthetic cousin of progesterone) therapy.

Type: 
Articles
Life Phase: 
Perimenopause, Menopause

Beyond “Estrogen Deficiency”—news from Women’s Health Initiative

When the USA’s National Institutes of Health announced that the Estrogen arm of the Women’s Health Initiative was stopped early, no one could ever say again that estrogen therapy prevents heart disease. Estrogen treatment in women who had undergone hysterectomy was associated with neither benefit nor harm for heart disease and caused a 40% increase in stroke.

Type: 
Articles
Life Phase: 
Menopause

Perimenopause is a time of “Endogenous Ovarian Hyperstimulation”

Perimenopausal endogenous ovarian hyper-stimulation” is the exact opposite of “The Myth of the Shriveling Ovary”: High estrogen levels during perimenopause, coupled with characteristically intermittent ovulation, can explain much of the misery of perimenopause.

Type: 
Articles
Life Phase: 
Perimenopause

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Join a Study:

Enrolment complete: Perimenopausal Hot Flush Study

Enrolment is now complete. Thank you for your interest.
CeMCOR is now recruiting Canadian women for this CIHR-funded randomized controlled trial to test whether oral micronized progesterone is more effective than placebo as therapy for hot flushes and night sweats in perimenopausal women.

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Get Involved

Volunteer research participants are the heart of all CeMCOR research. Participants are invited to provide feedback on study processes, to learn their own results and at the end of a study, be the first to hear what the whole study found. Please become a CeMCOR research participant—you can contribute to improving the scientific information available for daughters, friends and the wider world of women.